Friday, 28 June 2019

What are the benefits of hiring a life coach?
You start taking more effective and focused actions immediately
  • You stop putting up with petty annoyances
  • You create momentum so it’s easier to get results
  • You set better goals that are based on what you really want
  • You have more time and energy

Wednesday, 26 June 2019

Affect/effect

It’s an easy enough mistake to make given how similar these two words look and sound, but there’s a simple explanation to help you remember the difference.

The rules:

Affect is a verb – “to affect” – meaning to influence or have an impact on something.
Effect is the noun – “a positive effect” – referring to the result of being affected by something.
There is also a verb “to effect”, meaning to bring something about – “to effect a change”. However, this is not very commonly used, so we’ve left it out of the examples below to avoid confusion.

How not to do it:

He waited for the medicine to have an affect
They were directly effected by the flooding

How to do it properly:

He waited for the medicine to have an effect
They were directly affected by the flooding

To/two/too

It’s time to revisit another common grammar mistake that we also covered in our homophones post, as no article on grammar gripes would be complete without it. It’s easy to see why people get this one wrong, but there’s no reason why you should.

The rules:

“To” is used in the infinitive form of a verb – “to talk”.
“To” is also used to mean “towards”.
“Too” means “also” or “as well”.
“Two” refers to the number 2.

How not to do it:

I’m to hot
It’s time two go
I’m going too town
He bought to cakes

How to do it properly:

I’m too hot
It’s time to go
I’m going to town
He bought two cakes

There/their/they’re

We’ve met this one before, too; it’s another example of those pesky homophones – words that sound the same but have different meanings.

The rules:

Use “there” to refer to a place that isn’t here – “over there”.
We also use “there” to state something – “There are no cakes left.”
“Their” indicates possession – something belonging to them.
“They’re” is short for “they are”.

How not to do it:

Their going to be here soon
We should contact they’re agent
Can we use there boat?
Their is an argument that says

How to do it properly:

They’re going to be here soon
We should contact their agent
Can we use their boat?
There is an argument that says

“Could/would/should of”

This common mistake arises because the contracted form of “could have” – “could’ve” – sounds a bit like “could of” when you say it out loud. This mistake is made frequently across all three of these words.

The rules:

When people write “should of”, what they really mean is “should have”.
Written down, the shortened version of “should have” is “should’ve”.
“Should’ve” and “Should have” are both correct; the latter is more formal.

How not to do it:

We could of gone there today
I would of done it sooner
You should of said

How to do it properly:

We could’ve gone there today
I would have done it sooner
You should’ve said

Its/it’s

We said earlier that apostrophes should be used to indicate possession, but there is one exception to this rule, and that is the word “it”. Unsurprisingly, this exception gets lots of people confused.

The rules:

“It’s” is only ever used when short for “it is”.
“Its” indicates something belonging to something that isn’t masculine or feminine (like “his” and “hers”, but used when you’re not talking about a person).
If it helps, remember that inanimate objects can’t really possess something in the way a human can.

How not to do it:

Its snowing outside
The sofa looks great with it’s new cover

How to do it properly:

It’s snowing outside
The sofa looks great with its new cover

 Your/you’re

We covered this one before in our post on homophones, but it’s such a widespread problem that there’s no harm in covering it again.

The rules:

“Your” indicates possession – something belonging to you.
“You’re” is short for “you are”.

How not to do it:

Your beautiful
Do you know when your coming over?
Can I have one of you’re biscuits?

How to do it properly:

You’re beautiful
Do you know when you’re coming over?
Can I have one of your biscuits?